Rusko w/ Special Guests

Sunday, October 31, 2021
Show | 8pm // Doors | 7pm
Advanced: $29.50 / Day of Show: $35 (+fees)
Aggie Theatre Presents
Rusko
w/ Special Guests
 
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Effective September 13, attendees will be required to show proof of full COVID-19 vaccination (14 days after second vaccine) with a matching valid ID to enter our venues. Following the county-wide mask mandate, masks will be required at all times except when actively eating or drinking. We will no longer accept negative PCR tests for entry starting September 13. Children ages 2-11 will not need proof of vaccination but will be required to wear masks while in the venue. All working staff are vaccinated and will be wearing masks. A photo or digital copy of your vaccination card will be accepted. Digital copies can be obtained through https://ciis.state.co.us/public/Application/PublicPortal or https://mycolorado.state.co.us.

 

Refunds are available if you or someone in your party will not be able to provide proof of full vaccination. We would appreciate it if you would contact us as soon as possible and at least one week prior to the show date at [email protected] to request a refund. 

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Hello, world: Rusko kindly requests that you wake the fuck up. The Leeds-born DJ/producer who ascended with the original U.K. dubstep movement — and gave it one of its first and most enduring anthems, a bolt of foul-mouthed rave lightening called “Cockney Thug” — is here to tell you that music is not about labels and dance is no fad. And to prove it, he proudly presents “SONGS”: His gutsy, freewheeling, brilliant second album. “The sound of my early releases was very dub-influenced, and just good, fun, bouncy vibes,” he says. “The majority of dubstep at the moment I think is aggressive, and I don’t like angry music; I don’t want to be angry in a club. So I wanted to make something really happy, but still heavy.” “Happy and heavy” is a proper way to describe the vibe that has carried Rusko from the first moments of dubstep’s life to the biggest stages in the world; from a single, seminal bass wobble to a swath of sounds that can’t be capped in a few simple syllables. He might be one of the guys who started it all — but he’s sure as hell not going to leave it at that. A staple of the global electronic underground, Rusko has packed nightclubs, concert venues and festivals across the world, and not only dance-dedicated ones: From Electric Daisy Carnival and Ultra Music Festival, to Coachella and Lollapalooza; from Germany’s Melt! to Australia’s Good Vibrations. He created the majority of “O.M.G.!,” his hard-hitting debut artist album, on the road, cutting tracks by day, and testing them on living, breathing dance floors by night. But for the follow-up, he wanted to try a different strategy. “From January to late September 2011, I didn’t make a single track,” he says. “I spent all that time touring around the world, building up a massive swell of ideas inside me.” With the long tour done, the artist took two months completely off and ensconced himself in a tiny one-room studio in California’s Hollywood Hills, with no phone reception and spotty-at-best Internet access. The hermit style paid off. “I made all 14 songs in 8 weeks,” he says. “I didn’t try any out like before; I just stayed in the same headspace and vibe, and made the whole album in one go. You can really tell: Compared to ‘O.M.G.!,’ it sounds like one crazy Technicolor song!” There is indeed a rowdy kind of sprightliness throughout “SONGS,” which sets a wizard’s box of dance music charms to some of its most misunderstood: cracking, smacking breakbeats, and reverberant, sonic-boom bass. The rave piano vamp of first single “Somebody to Love,” the accelerated classic house of “Pressure,” the head-nodding reggae of “Skanker,” the epically trancey sweep of “Opium” and “Thunder,” even “Dirty Sexy,” a tongue-y but not so cheeky nugget of American-style R&B: They all express a different part of what makes Rusko pogo like a punk while he spins, and carry the energy and soul of his inimitable, genre-be-damned style. Back in 2007 — when “dubstep” was an idea known to a critical few — Rusko and DJ/producer Caspa lit the spark with a dubstep-dedicated mix for London nightclub Fabric’s influential compilation series Fabriclive.